Session Details

Conveners:

Ramon Lopez, Eugene Rozanov, Jie Zhang, M. Venkat Ratnam

Description:

The Predictability of the variable Solar-Terrestrial Coupling (PRESTO) program focuses on the predictability of phenomena in the Sun-Earth environment, ranging from solar activity to the effects on Earth’s magnetosphere, ionosphere, and neutral atmosphere down to the troposphere. PRESTO covers both short time-scale phenomena such as solar eruptions long time-scale ones such as solar influences on climate. There are three scientific Pillars in the PRESTO program: Sun, Planetary Space, and Geospace, Space Weather and Earth’s Atmosphere, and Solar Activity and its Influence On Climate. In this session, we will provide an overview of the PRESTO Pillars and the science questions that they address. We will also provide details on the activities of the PRESTO program (including grant support to PRESTO-related activities), and mechanisms for getting involved in the PRESTO program and contributing to the resolution of the science questions. In addition, this session welcomes presentations that connect regions and time scales of different Pillars, and the general topic of the Sun-Earth connection with an emphasis on the scientific basis of predictability

Invited Speakers: N. Krivova, Alexi Glover, Jim Spann.

Conveners:

Allison Jaynes, Emilia Kilpua,Spiros Patsourakos, Nandita Srivastava

Description:

The Pillar 1 session will focus on the topic of accurate predictions of geospace weather, highlighting the role of propagating solar wind structures, magnetospheric dynamics, and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in geoeffective space weather events. Open questions include the following: Are there predictors of geoeffective solar eruptions, CMEs, and SEP events? What model inputs are necessary for the successful forecasting of solar events and their subsequent effects on the magnetosphere-ionosphere system? How are inner magnetospheric dynamics driven by solar wind structures? We solicit presentations on these topics, especially those spanning model and data use to arrive at more accurate predictions of heliospheric transients and their resulting geospace disturbances.

Invited Speakers: Manolis Georgoulis, Teresa Nieves-Chinchilla, Camilla Scolini, Eleanna Asvestari.

Conveners:

Loren Chang, Duggirala Pallamraju, Nick Pedatella

Description:

The thermosphere and the ionosphere (IT system) form the interface between geospace and the Earth’s atmosphere, while also serving as the operational environment for the majority of Earth-orbiting satellites, and strongly influencing satellite and terrestrial navigation and communications systems. The mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) together serve as a critical interface between the IT system and the lower atmosphere.  The IT and MLT systems are affected by solar and geomagnetic drivers from above, as well as from waves and tides originating in the lower atmosphere. This session will address questions relevant to understanding the effects of these physical and chemical drivers and the predictability of the IT/MLT system as a whole.

Invited Speakers: Huixin Liu, Claudia Stolle, Dibyendu Chakrabarty, Lynn Harvey.

Conveners:

Odele Coddington, Jie Jiang, Stergios Misios, Subramanian Gurubaran

Description:

Reliable decadal timescale predictions of solar activity and its influence on Earth’s climate requires an improved understanding of the mechanisms modulating the solar cycle and the physical pathways wherein solar variability impacts the atmosphere, from the magnetosphere through the troposphere. In this session, we will address the mechanisms that drive the solar activity cycle, what has been learned about the solar forcing impact on the Earth’s climate, and how this knowledge can be translated into future predictions of the Sun’s activity and its impact on Earth’s climate.

Invited Speakers: Ville Maliniemi, Annika Drews, Dibyendu Nandi, Erik Richard.

Conveners:

Kyung-Suk Cho, Peter Pilewskie, Pravata Mohanty

Description:

For several decades, space weather prediction has been developed through a collaboration between basic science research and operational forecast to protect from a space weather disaster. However, the mechanism of space weather disturbances and their consequences have not yet been fully understood, and a gap between scientific research and operation forecast has not been reduced dramatically. This session will help the attendees to recognize the current status of space weather prediction and archive benchmarks for the better prediction and implementation of space weather.

Invited Speakers: Kanya Kusano, Ioannis Daglis.

Conveners:

Daniel Marsh, Yoshizumi Miyoshi, Annika Seppälä

Description:

Making significant progress in solar-terrestrial research will likely require an integrated view, where models and data are brought together using analysis tools to develop our physical understanding of the many pathways by which the Sun and Earth are coupled. This session seeks presentations on new advances in the modeling of all components of the solar-terrestrial chain, established and new databases relevant to STP research, and emerging data analysis tools. Presentations suitable for this session include but are not limited to, those that 1) identify key deficiencies in models and how to remedy them, 2) illustrate the potential of cloud computing and/or new computing architecture, 3) present new technology that enables access to observational and model data, and 4) addresses the challenges of analyzing big data, standardizing data and metadata formats and the application of data science methods such as machine learning.

Invited Speakers: Shing F. Fung, Jacob Bortnik

Conveners:

Jorge Chau, Renata Lukianova, Nat Gopalswamy

Description:

This session involves new initiatives around the world in planning, developing, and deploying new instruments in-ground- and space-based observing systems that provide new and unique data for solving problems in solar-terrestrial physics. There are several new efforts to explore the solar-terrestrial environment to provide crucial data that fill current gaps. Examples of such observing platforms, in addition to ground-based ones, are stratospheric balloons, the international space station, CubeSats, small satellites, and deep space spacecraft. Instrumentation examples are innovative telescopes at various wavelengths, detectors for in-situ measurements, multi-static radar systems, compact lidars, etc. Papers dealing with all aspects of new observational infrastructure initiatives, making emphasis on data gaps to be covered, are welcome.

Invited Speakers: Theodoros Sarris, Raffaele Marino, Ian McCrea, Durgesh Tripathi.

Conveners:

Geeta Vichare, Gopi Seemala, Jurgen Matzka, Masahito Nose

Description:

The analysis of geomagnetic field records is crucial in understanding the solar-terrestrial relationship and the dynamics and history of the Earth. Geomagnetic observatories along with the magnetic observations from various satellite missions play a significant role in the modeling of Earth’s magnetic field in the modern era. Marking the Golden Jubilee year (1971-2021) of the Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, which has been managing the Alibag observatory since its establishment in 1904, a special session is arranged. This session aims to exchange and share current research in geomagnetism and neighboring fields and to especially highlight their role in investigating the link between the Sun and Earth. It will provide an interdisciplinary platform for researchers to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, concerns, practical challenges encountered, and solutions adopted in the fields of geomagnetism.

Invited Speakers: Gurbax Lakhina, Y. Yamazaki, A. K. Sinha, Seiki Asari, Amore Nel, Juergen Matzka.